Sunday

Day Four: Thanksgiving Progressive Dinner~Blog Style~Remains of a Thanksgiving Feast

Classic Turkey~Noodle Soup!


When I was a child the meals served at our table on the days following Thangsgiving were often turkey based. While I still find it amazing that something so ordinary as turkey can be magically transformed into significantly different dishes such as Turkey Tacos and Arroz con Turkey...




Classic Turkey~Noodle Soup remains my all~time favorite way to use the remains of a Thanksgiving feast! 


Of course...it's always a pleasure to share a bowl with family, friends, co~workers and neighbors!




Here's my favorite way to make...

Classic Turkey~Noodle Soup

Make your broth by simmering the turkey bones (i.e., carcass) in water for several hours,you must keep an eye on this so that it doesn't boil down and burn. (Add more water if/when needed.) An easy way to do this is to put it all in a slow~cooker overnight...no pot~watching necessary! HINT: For extra flavor and nutrition I like to add trimmings from carrots, celery, and onions...I also put in about a teaspoon of cider vinegar to extract calcium from the bones. I also add a few pinches of sea salt as well as a clove or two of garlic, unpeeled is okay!
Turkey bones and vegetable scraps inside my slow cooker transform into a delicious, nutritious, economical broth.

Broth is done after several hours on the stove top or overnight in the slow cooker. A
llow bones and broth to cool thoroughly before handling. Once it's safe to handle, set a colander inside a larger bowl~~one that's large enough to hold the liquid from your broth. Strain the bones from the broth by pouring it all into the colander. Be careful. Lift the colander from inside the bowl and pull off the good bits of turkey meat to use in your soup. Dice this turkey meat and set aside. Note: Discard the bones and scraps as per your habit~we always make kitty food from the less appealing turkey scraps...the cats love it!

Saute' diced carrots, celery and onion in your soup kettle before adding liquid.

Dice up several carrots, celery and a large onion. Next, dump them all into your soup kettle with a small amount of oil (I use olive oil or coconut oil). Saute' just until the onions are translucent. Sometimes I like to add a clove or two of minced garlic as well.

Carefully pour your cooled, strained broth into the soup kettle atop your sauteed vegetables. If you need more liquid go ahead and add it a cup at a time until all the vegetables are covered.

Add a teaspoon of sea salt, 1/4 teaspoon cracked black pepper and a bay leaf. Simmer until vegetables are tender. Hint: Long ago, my friend Gina shared her secret for an even more delicious and nutritious broth...add about a cup of frozen spinach! It sounds strange, but it tastes delicious and immediately boils down to look like parsley and no one ever knows it's there but me (and now you!)...don't let the kids see you do this! ;)

Season your broth to taste...careful not to burn your tongue!

Carefully taste your broth to see if you need more seasonings. It's been my experience that sometimes it tastes not quite right until you add more salt (I find this especially true when you're serving it to those who are used~to eating canned soup flavors). Just add a small amount at a time so as not to over~salt it! If you like, you may omit the extra salt and add a few teaspoons of chicken bouillon (this adds a lot of salt and gives the flavor a bit more punch...sometimes I do this and sometimes it doesn't need it...each broth seems to have its own personality ;).

Add cooked,drained egg noodles.

While soup is simmering over a low heat, I usually cook my egg noodles (according to package directions). Hint: I used about one and a half cups(uncooked) noodles for this batch of soup(pictured below). Strain cooked noodles and set aside.

Hint: I carefully (don't burn your tongue!) taste the soup throughout the simmering process and add flavors as needed.

Once I have the soup to my liking, I turn it off and add the diced turkey meat I set aside earlier along with the cooked egg noodles. Serve at once or put in the refrigerator to serve later!

Classic Turkey~Noodle~Soup from the remains of your Thanksgiving Feast!

Sending good thoughts and love to all!


Warmly,


Tracey and Family x0x



All Images

14 comments:

poindextr said...

thank you for sharing - particularly the hint about adding frozen spinach. I've never heard of that technique and it sounds like a perfectly wonderful trick that could work with any number of soups. Thanks so much for today's installment of the progressive dinner Tracey :) xo, diane

Tracey McBride ~ Frugal Luxuries® said...

Well thank YOU Diane, for the gracious invitation. This has been a lot of fun!

So glad you liked the spinach hint...you are so smart too as I use it in almost all of my soups...and even in chilis and marinara sauces!
Love,
Tracey
x0x

P.S. I've also used fresh French Sorrel in soups (from the herb garden) in the same way as the spinach!

Brenda@CoffeeTeaBooks said...

My mother-in-law always started the turkey soup simmering as soon as the dishes were being cleared from Thanksgiving dinner.

I also use the turkey to make soup but a few years ago when I wasn't feeling well, I was tempted to just throw it out (at the time I didn't have a deep freeze).

I told my husband I knew his mom was in Heaven but did he think she'd come and haunt me if I threw the turkey carcass out? Hmmmm...

We both agreed I'd better make soup, just to be on the safe side. ;)

Tracey McBride ~ Frugal Luxuries® said...

Hahahah...what a great story1 You are a wise woman Brenda...better to be safe than sorry! We usually have so much turkey left (on purpose for our planned~overs ;) that I usually leave it on the platter for Mike and my dad to snack on throughout the evening and the next day. It's only when all the warm and cold turkey sandwiches have been eaten am I allowed to remove the remaining meat (for use in tacos and the like) and make my soup broth! :)

Love,
Tracey
x0x

Carrie said...

This looks wonderful! Just by looking at it, I feel warmer on this cool day!

Storybook Woods said...

What a wonderful recipe Tracey and a yummy way to use up leftovers. I really love the idea to jarring it up as gifts for friends. Brillant!!! xox Clarice

Tracey McBride ~ Frugal Luxuries® said...

Thank so much Carrie! I have to tell you I am intrigued by your stuffing recipe with the Italian sausage...I know I'll be thinking about it all day!
Love,
Tracey
x0x

Tracey McBride ~ Frugal Luxuries® said...

Awww, so nice that you appreciated that little touch Clarice! It reminds me of something you might do as well. :)))
Love,
Tracey
x0x

Terri said...

Do you use fresh spinach or frozen? And if frozen I assume it should be thawed and squeezed dry and chopped? I want to try this. We only ever get turkey breasts but I save the carcass for soup all the same.

Tracey McBride ~ Frugal Luxuries® said...

Hi Terri, great question! Both work well, but primarily I use frozen as it's so easy to keep on hand and quite reasonable (1.19 for a large bag at Trader Joe's). If it's frozen, I just throw in a chunk...no thawing and draining needed! If it's fresh, I'm just careful to chop it very finely so that it dissolves well (especially important if you get a tough bunch). Turkey breasts make great broth, as does a turkey leg or two (a great bargain as well)!
Love,
Tracey
x0x

Children of Eve said...

After seeing this post I am now on a thrifting search for a soup tureen. It makes this tasty soup look even more special!

Tracey McBride ~ Frugal Luxuries® said...

Hi Eve! Well, it's funny, I found this tureen at the Goodwill about a dozen years ago. It was marked $12 and I thought that was too much (!) and waited until half~price day and bought it for $6. It's been used for many a soup, stew and even flower arrangement over the years.
Love,
Tracey
x0x

Kimberly said...

We had a bunch of company on Thanksgiving and someone brought the turkey. So I decided to roast mine on Saturday and dinner tonight was Turkey Soup.
I just dished it up from the stove. Maybe next time I will use a tureen. :)

Tracey McBride ~ Frugal Luxuries® said...

Sounds as if you had a wonderful day Kimberly! How lucky you are to be forging such a wonderful sense of community in your new home. :)
As for the tureen, it looks so pretty but I have to say that the soup does get cold fairly quickly...however...that can be bypassed for serving it forth immediately!
Love,
Tracey
x0x

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